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Jean Daudelin

Doutor em Ciência Política (Université Laval). Desde 2002 é Professor Associado na Norman Paterson School of International Affairs, Carleton University. Tem experiência em Relações Internacionais das Américas, Política Externa Brasileira, Políticas de Drogas, Mercados Ilegais e Violência. É pesquisador do Núcleo de Estudos em Política Comparada e Relações Internacionais (NEPI/UFPE) e do Núcleo de Estudos e Pesquisas em Criminalidade, Violência e Políticas Públicas de Segurança.

Hollowed out: What UNGASS 2016 will tell us about the Global drug regime

Hollowed out: What UNGASS 2016 will tell us about the Global drug regime

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* NPSIA Next week, the United Nations will hold a special general assembly on drug policy. Liberalizers hope that it will be an opportunity to put harm reduction first and to push aside the prohibitionist agenda: the beginning of the end for the disastrous "War on Drugs" of the last 40 years. Most drug use would at least be decriminalized, research on the health effects—positive and negative—of currently illegal drugs would be facilitated, and problematic use of cocaine, heroin, ecstasy, LSD or amphetamine would be seen, along with Fentanyl—as a health and social problem, instead of a crime. Overall it would be a great boon for public health and to some extent public safety too. But such a sharp change at the international level will not happen, no at UNGASS and not i
The industrialization mirage: politicians’ and experts’ heads are stuck in the manufacturing sands

The industrialization mirage: politicians’ and experts’ heads are stuck in the manufacturing sands

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* Try to forget industrialization: it's essentially over and it won't happen again. The challenge is to grow rich and not too unequal with service economies. From Nigeria, Brazil and India, to Canada, France and the United States, the discussion of the future of economic growth is obsessed with industrialization. Everybody wants a share of the shrinking pot of manufacturing jobs. In Brazil, the private sector and the opposition, in the now rare instances when they discuss policy, complain that the government hasn't been able to stop the dis-industrialization that has plagued Brazil essentially since the election of Collor de Melo. Obviously, they are right—about this government, Lula's and Cardoso's too: the proportion of industrial value added in Brazil's GDP, which h
Theory and real foreign policy (2): elements of a way out

Theory and real foreign policy (2): elements of a way out

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* [This is the second of two posts with the same title. In the first, I discuss the lack of relevance of much contemporary IR and the "root causes" of the problem. Here, I try to show how "good" theory and the right time horizon could greatly enhance the relevance of IR studies] IR would gain a lot by going back to its roots in classical social science and political economy, particularly those few theories that make the formulation of causal hypotheses possible. I will briefly outline a few examples of propositions based on such theories and show how they produce quite interesting outcomes. The first builds on an already old idea about the logic of state building. It is best exemplified by Charles Tilly's famous paper on "War Making and State Making as Organized Crime...
Theory and real foreign policy (1): the problem

Theory and real foreign policy (1): the problem

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* [This is the first of two posts. Here, I introduce what I consider to be a central problem of contemporary IR, namely its relevance for policy. In a second one, I will outline the basic conditions for that relevance to be enhanced, and give an example with the current crisis in the Middle East as an illustration] There are more trained specialists in international relations today than ever before. Every university of some standing in the whole world has at least one program on global, international or world affairs or relations. The number of journals, scholarly books and academic articles available is overwhelming and new ones are popping up all the time. Conferences, workshops and e-talks can easily fill anybody's agenda. And yet, when I look at the policy discussi...
Is Argentina back on the world’s map?

Is Argentina back on the world’s map?

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* Argentina has the second largest economy of South America (after Brazil), its third largest population (after Brazil and Colombia) and, in spite of all the problems of recent years, the region's second highest GDP (PPP) per capita (after Chile). It’s a huge country whose agricultural potential and agro-business productivity are phenomenal, it has large reserves of gas and, for almost a century and in spite of recent difficulties, it has boasted one of the best educated population of the continent. And yet, it has had no significant international or even regional presence or influence for at least 50 years. During that period, with brutally authoritarian or utterly dysfunctional democratic political systems, inconsistent public policies, and one of the world's most vol
How much can an election change a country’s foreign policy? A few lessons from the next four years in Canada

How much can an election change a country’s foreign policy? A few lessons from the next four years in Canada

Jean Daudelin
Por Jean Daudelin* On October 18 in Canada, against all pre-electoral forecasts, Justin Trudeau's Liberal Party convincingly defeated Stephen Harper's Conservatives. Over his nine years in power, Harper had taken Canada into policy directions where the country had rarely ventured. Canada's international and domestic image of a generous blue-helmetted bridge-builder has morphed into that of a body-armoured carbon-spewing tough out to re-fight the Cold War and give muslim fundamentalists what they deserve. Canada's careful fence-sitting in the Middle-East, and its diplomats' hyperactivism in all the clubs, summits and organizations that would invite them, was replaced by a strong alignment with the current Israeli government's rigid policies, and with a quiet disinvestment and sometimes o...